Unique chain bomb protest against TPPA

In the lead up to the Trans Pacific Partnership Agreement (TPPA) signing in Auckland this Thursday 4 February, numerous protests and demonstrations have been held around the country opposing the controversial trade agreement.

Amid the nationwide movement to oppose the TPPA, Raglan held its own unique event: a mass chain bomb off the Papahua Bridge (commonly referred to as the walk bridge).

Over 200 children and adults took part in the peaceful event with lines of people jumping off into the water to whoops and cheers from the crowd.

Video footage of the chain bomb has been circulating around Facebook and major media outlets have reported on the Raglan event including TVNZ and the NZ Herald. At the time this article was written, one video had clocked up to 40,000 views and 1600 shares.

Coastguard, St. John, Police and surf life savers were also in attendance to ensure the chain bombing was a safe event.

On Thursday this week, representatives from the 12 member countries will meet at SkyCity in Auckland where the agreement is expected to be signed. Several protests and hikoi are planned to march up Queen Street on the day and the Auckland Council has advised city workers to work remotely if they are able to.

According to AUT professor of international business Peter Enderwick, not much could derail the signing process. However, once all 12 member countries have signed, each country has two years to ratify the TPPA. Ideally the agreement will be endorsed by all 12 member countries but it could still proceed if six or more members endorse it, provided the six member nations’ combined GDP is equal to 85% or more of the 12 original member countries.

For more information on the TPPA visit: http://itsourfuture.org.nz/what-is-the-tppa/

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